Do’s And Don’ts of Video Resumes



A video resume describes the individual’s skills and experience and is typically used to supplement a paper resume. As with a print resume, it’s possible for the video resume to be either general or targeted toward a particular position or company.

Creating a video resume is an optional task for job seekers (very rarely will companies require or request a video resume from candidates). For some job seekers, particularly ones in visual or creative fields, a video resume can highlight important skills. For instance, a video resume is useful for showing any type of performance-based work, whether it involves acting on stage, teaching a class, or presenting quarterly numbers.

Important tools you’re going to need for you video

  • A camera
  • A professional background
  • An editor

We have what you need at where is the beef, check out our website and find how we can make job seeking easier for you.

For instance, a video resume is useful for showing any type of performance-based work, whether it involves acting on stage, teaching a class, or presenting quarterly numbers.

Let’s discuss the rules in recording video resume:

Be professional:

Dress the same way you would for an interview, this shows you’re professional and aren’t doing it for laughs, maintain a professional demeanour. Avoid slang and, of course, cursing. Pay attention, too, to the background of shots, and make sure it looks tidy, and represents you well. Do not add background music that could be interpreted and noise. It will be distracting

Structure your video content.

It’s advised that you have a script written for your video that way you won’t say anything unnecessary, and misrepresent yourself. It’s normal to feel scatter-brained when sitting in front of a camera so structure your speech. The main points to express in the video are what you’ll provide the company, and your major goals, skills, and accomplishments. Think of the video as being a pitch for why the company should hire you.


Know your audience.

As you plan your script and filming location, consider who will watch the video, and calibrate accordingly. A video prepared for a position at a bank might differ from a video prepared for a media company. Also research on the company you’re applying to that way you’ll know their needs and what is expected of you.


Keep is Super Short.

Any video above 4 minutes is too long. Videos should be between 30 to 90 seconds. Anything longer than that is unlikely to be watched.


Show, Don’t tell

Use visuals to illustrate what you’re saying in the video script and showcase your talents and skills. For instance, if you’re applying for a job in graphic designing, you can film yourself designing a really cool poster and 3D visual.


Get feedback form close family and friends.

Get your family or friends to watch your video and tell you if they would hire you if they were your potential employer. Family usually has no reason to be dishonest with you and thus will give you reliable criticism.


Don’t mix your personal life with your professional one.

If you have information on your Facebook or Twitter page that you’d prefer employers don’t see, don’t link your video resume to any of these pages.


Don’t expect your video resume to replace your traditional resume.

Not all employers are interested in a video resume, and others are worried about discrimination issues, such as hiring candidates because of how they look and sound rather than their qualifications. However, a well-done video can bolster your candidacy for employment.

Important tools you’re going to need for you video

  • A camera
  • A professional background
  • An editor

We have what you need at Where is the Beef, check out our website www.whereisthebeef.co.za/#content and find how we can make job seeking easier for you.

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